THE W. EDWARDS DEMING INSTITUTE BLOG

Green crops in rows with a sunrise sky above them.

Bees, Ants, Elephants, and Crops: Systemic Thinking for Innovation

In this guest post by John Hunter, he explores how using Deming systemic thinking leads to innovation, when the urge to "just do what we've always done" is strong.
Old fashioned rotary phone with the receiver off ot the left, attached by a cord.

The Focus of Customer Service

In this guest post, John Hunter uses his recent frustrating customer service experience to explore why Deming's approach to customers, continual improvement, and determining your AIM is better for everyone.
Dr. Deming holding a bouquet of flowers shaking hands with factory workers in Japan.

W. Edwards Deming is Not a Method or Program

In this guest post, Ed Baker describes how the Deming philosophy is a unique and all-encompassing way of thinking. Unlike TQM, Six Sigma, Lean Manufacturing, and other programs promoted to improve quality and productivity, Deming is not simply a checklist, program, or set of methods for managers.
3 images of college students. From left to right: 5 students with backpacks waving at the camera, 2 students walking and talking while carrying binders and papers, and 4 students grouped around a laptop with one woman sitting at the keyboard. Everyone is smiling in all the photos.

Creating Joy in Learning: Deming in Education (Part 2)

“Deming helped me not be a victim of the system.” This is the second of two articles about Deming in education, based on an interview with David P. Langford. In this
White board with red and blue lines criss crossing and connecting small blocks of text in different languages.

Long Term Planning: Considering Climate Change

In this guest post, John Hunter explores the problem of including - or not including - the impact of climate change in your long-term business plans.
Young children sitting on a carpet in front of a teacher who is reading a book to them.

Joy in Learning: Deming in Education (part 1)

Dr. Deming believed everyone is entitled to joy in work, and extended that to education as well. David P. Langford has worked to implement Deming in schools and education systems around the world, and in this first of two posts about his work, Christina Dragonetti relates how he got started and the impact of introducing the Deming philosophy - based on joy in learning - into classrooms.
Series of wooden gears in a horizontal line, each held by a person's fingers.

Why Did the Management System Allow the Failure?

In this guest post, John Hunter explores the questions management should ask when there's a failure or problem, rather than blaming an individual.
Image of Deming Chain Reaction - text: Improve Quality —> Costs decrease because of less rework, fewer mistakes, fewer delays, snags, better use of machine-time and materials —> Productivity Improves —> Capture the market with better quality and lower price —> Stay in Business —> Provide jobs and more jobs

Using Customer Feedback to Drive Continual Improvement

In this guest post, John Hunter focuses on how improving the quality of your products or services cuts costs.
Part of a compass sitting on map grid lines, in yellow and sepia tones.

Beginning the Deming Journey: a Newbie’s Perspective

New to The Deming Institute, Christina Dragonetti describes the beginning of her Deming journey, reflects on a previous employer's disaster when they only went halfway with Deming, and offers examples and tips for others early in their Deming journey.
image with text - Deming’s First Theorem: “Nobody gives a hoot about profits.”

Russell Ackoff: Solving Problems with an Appreciation for Systems

In this guest post, John Hunter revisits a 2004 video of Russell Ackoff, and the lessons we can still learn from him.
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